GEAR | Spring Anoraks


It's officially Spring, which means anorak season for most of the country. Curious about the word anorak, I looked into it briefly and couldn't really make heads or tails of its etomology and history. That said, the light-weight anorak is on the rise again and there's an incredible edit of new and vintage (90s brands that include L.L. Bean, Helly Hansen, The Gap, Patagonia and Umbro) versions at the Brooklyn-based label Victory Press. Prices start at $35.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Pardon any rudeness, but *etymology, I think you mean. (Entomology is bugs.)

Talia said...

Bugs definitely need a hard shell though :)

Lizzie said...

Haha, thanks! Fixing.

Poppy K said...

I remember when the height of fashion at my suburban Chicago junior high was to have a Mother Karen color-blocked anorak. Mine was kelly green and navy blue - similar to this one: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Mother-Karens-80s-Powder-Jacket-Blk-Lavender-Arms-60-40-Nyco-Mtn-Cloth-M-VGC-/371028952323?pt=US_CSA_MC_Outerwear&hash=item56630c8503

Lizzie said...

@Poppy K

Love it.

Liz said...

"Anorak" is a French word meaning "hooded jacket"

Ann Th said...

Actually, anorak is a word of Eskimo/Inuit/Greelandic origin.
The Great Danish Encyclopedia (Gyldendal) says:
”(greenl. anoraq, of anore 'wind', Eskimo annoraag), tight clothing that is pulled over the head and have a sewn on hood. It comes from Greenland where it was originally made of fur. From the middle of the 19th century the cotton fabric was known in Greenland, and consequently anoraks of colored cotton were worn for everyday use and black, later white on Sundays and on holidays. The anorak came to Europe and the United States approx. 1955, and was then, as now often used for winter sports.”

Love your blog btw.